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Old Fashioned Maple & Walnut Fudge

Super rich and ever-so-creamy, this Old Fashioned Maple & Walnut Fudge is made with real Maple Syrup, cream, butter and walnuts.

Super rich and ever-so-creamy, this Old Fashioned Maple & Walnut Fudge is made with real Maple Syrup, cream, butter and walnuts.

Did you know that March is prime maple harvesting season?

Since Canada produces about 75% of the world’s maple, you could say that it is the true flavour of the north.

Indeed, the taste of maple is loved from coast to coast to coast.  I am excited to share with you a maple-based recipe to celebrate the natural goodness of Maple Syrup – Old Fashioned Maple & Walnut Fudge.

Super rich and ever-so-creamy, this Old Fashioned Maple & Walnut Fudge is made with real Maple Syrup, cream, butter and walnuts.

When I was a kid my parents would sometimes head to Niagara on the Lake for a weekend and come back with the most amazing fudge.

In fact, I am almost certain that the fudge at Niagara on the Lake is pretty much the best you can get.

One of my favourite flavours is their Maple Walnut fudge. Such a classic and delicious pairing!

Now I don’t know how they make their fudge, but this recipe is at least as good. Unlike many homemade fudge recipes you can find, this one is super simple with fresh, real ingredients that results in creamy maple fudge.

This not be an easy fudge recipe, but as long as you follow all the directions it will be so worthwhile. It’s a good idea that you make sure the first time you make fudge that you read through the entire recipe first so you understand the steps. Traditional fudge is finicky to make!

Super rich and ever-so-creamy, this Old Fashioned Maple & Walnut Fudge is made with real Maple Syrup, cream, butter and walnuts.

Ingredients for Pure Maple Fudge Recipe

You won’t find white chocolate chips, powdered sugar, condensed milk, or maple extract here, just pure, simple ingredients.

Maple syrup – Use only 100% pure, real maple syrup for this fudge. Do not try and use table syrup. Only maple syrup will give you real, authentic maple flavoring. The best maple syrup to choose is dark amber as it has a nice rich flavour, but any real maple syrup will do.

Heavy cream – Use full fat whipping cream. Not table cream, not half and half. Whipping cream.

Butter – You might notice a theme here, but, use only real butter. Not Margarine. I used salted butter, you might prefer to unsalted.

Walnuts – You can omit the walnuts for a plain maple fudge. I really love the crunch chopped walnuts give though, and I think you will like this maple nut fudge too.

Super rich and ever-so-creamy, this Old Fashioned Maple & Walnut Fudge is made with real Maple Syrup, cream, butter and walnuts.

 

 

How to Test Fudge Temperature Without a Thermometer

A candy thermometer is super handy when candy making, and fudge making is a lot easier with one. It is really important that your fudge reaches the perfect temperature, being off by even a couple of degrees could ruin your fudge.

I really prefer a digital thermometer as they tend to work quickly for a variety of purposes which makes them a great option if you are on the market for a thermometer.

If you don’t have a candy thermometer, no problem! Get a cup of cold water and test the mixture by dropping a small spoonful into the water.

The mixture is ready when you are able to pick it out of the water and roll it into a soft ball.

Super rich and ever-so-creamy, this Old Fashioned Maple & Walnut Fudge is made with real Maple Syrup, cream, butter and walnuts.

How do you Fix Grainy Fudge?

One reason your fudge turn out crumbly and hard it is because the syrup was overcooked. Another reason is if you stir the fudge while it is cooking. Don’t do that.

To salvage it, heat the fudge mixture in a saucepan with about 1/4 cup heavy cream. Bring to a boil and stir until it has completely melted. Return to a boil without stirring just until the candy thermometer reads 236 degrees F and no more. Then proceed with the rest of the recipe until you get delicious fudge.

How do you fix soft Fudge?

If the fudge is too soft or won’t set, then it was not cooked enough.

Simply return the mixture to your saucepan and bring back to a boil without stirring and allow to cook until the candy thermometer reads 236 degrees F or until the soft ball stage.

How to store Fudge

Traditional fudge is best stored at room temperature in an airtight container, this will prevent it from drying out, and help keep it fresh for longer. Do not refrigerate your fudge. Keep your fudge whole rather than cutting it into small pieces to help keep the fudge from drying out faster.

Fudge does freeze well, and thaws out quite nicely. It can be kept frozen for up to 3 months.

At room temperature, if stored in an air-tight container, the fudge can last up to 6-8 weeks. That said, it is best consumed within 4 weeks.

Super rich and ever-so-creamy, this Old Fashioned Maple & Walnut Fudge is made with real Maple Syrup, cream, butter and walnuts.

How to Make Old Fashioned Maple & Walnut Fudge

Super rich and ever-so-creamy, this Old Fashioned Maple & Walnut Fudge is the perfect treat for maple syrup season. Made with real Maple Syrup, cream, butter and walnuts, maple fudge doesn’t get any better than this!

Ingredients:

2 cups  pure maple syrup
1 cup heavy cream
1/4 cup Unsalted butter, room temperature
1/4 cup chopped walnuts

Directions:

Grease the sides of a metal loaf pan with butter, then line the pan with parchment paper from long side to long side, leaving a little overhang.

In a large saucepan, bring the maple syrup to a boil over medium heat then lower to a simmer for 5 minutes.

When the syrup rises as it boils, simply lift the pan from the heat for a few seconds and swirl the pan a little to keep the syrup from scorching.

Pour in the heavy cream without stirring it in and bring the mixture back to a boil  and simmer until it reaches 236°F on a candy thermometer*,  about 20-25 minutes. The mixture will rise again so watch it!

Remove the pan from the heat and add the butter without stirring and set aside to cool for about 10 minutes.

Transfer the mixture to a mixing bowl and beat with the paddle attachment on an electric mixer on medium speed until the mixture thickens and just starts to lose it’s sheen, about 5 minutes.

Fold in chopped walnuts.

Pour the fudge into the prepared pan and spread out evenly with a spatula and refrigerate until completely set, about 2 hours.

Super rich and ever-so-creamy, this Old Fashioned Maple & Walnut Fudge is made with real Maple Syrup, cream, butter and walnuts.


Lift the fudge from the pan and cut into squares with a sharp knife.

Store in an airtight container for up to a week.

Super rich and ever-so-creamy, this Old Fashioned Maple & Walnut Fudge is made with real Maple Syrup, cream, butter and walnuts.
Old Fashioned Maple & Walnut Fudge
Yield: 32 Squares

Old Fashioned Maple & Walnut Fudge

Prep Time: 30 minutes
Cook Time: 30 minutes
Time to Set: 2 hours
Total Time: 3 hours

Super rich and ever-so-creamy, this Old Fashioned Maple & Walnut Fudge is made with real Maple Syrup, cream, butter and walnuts.

Ingredients

  • 2 cups pure maple syrup
  • 1 cup heavy cream
  • 1/4 cup butter
  • 1/4 cup Walnuts, Chopped

Instructions

  1. Grease the sides of a metal loaf pan with butter, then line the pan with parchment paper from long side to long side, leaving a little overhang.
  2. In a large saucepan, bring the maple syrup to a boil over medium-high heat then lower to a simmer for 5 minutes.
  3. When the syrup rises as it boils, simply lift the pan from the heat for a few seconds and swirl the pan a little to keep the syrup from scorching.
  4. Pour in the heavy cream without stirring it in and bring the mixture back to a boil and simmer until it reaches 236°F on a candy thermometer*, about 20-25 minutes. The mixture will rise again so watch it!
  5. Remove the pan from the heat and add the butter without stirring and set aside to cool for about 10 minutes.
  6. Transfer the mixture to a mixing bowl and beat with the paddle attachment on an electric mixer on medium speed until the mixture thickens and just starts to lose it's sheen, about 5 minutes.
  7. Fold in Chopped Walnuts.
  8. Pour the fudge into the prepared pan and spread out evenly with a spatula and refrigerate until completely set, about 2 hours.
  9. Lift the fudge from the pan and cut into squares with a sharp knife.
  10. Store in an airtight container for up to a week.

Notes

If you don't have a candy thermometer, no problem! Get a cup of cold water and test the mixture by dropping a small spoonful into the water. The mixture is ready when you are able to pick it out of the water and roll it into a soft ball.

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Nutrition Information:

Yield:

32

Serving Size:

1 Square

Amount Per Serving: Calories: 97Total Fat: 5gSaturated Fat: 3gTrans Fat: 0gUnsaturated Fat: 2gCholesterol: 12mgSodium: 16mgCarbohydrates: 14gFiber: 0gSugar: 12gProtein: 0g

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Super rich and ever-so-creamy, this Old Fashioned Maple & Walnut Fudge is made with real Maple Syrup, cream, butter and walnuts.

Readers are Raving about this Old-Fashioned Fudge Recipe!

Check out what some people are saying:

This fudge is absolutely delicious, I love that it is only maple syrup, cream, butter and walnuts. It takes 40 minutes for it to reach 236° on my stove (I’m afraid to turn the heat up – don’t want to burn it). Everyone who’s tried it loves it!

Lucy Andrews

I made this recipe twice over the holidays! I’m a novice at fudge, so I’m super appreciative of the tips in the post. The first time around I had issues with it setting. After a simple reheat to the right temperature it turned out perfectly. The second time I made it, it turned out great the first time. Everyone I shared it with over the holidays loved it. I love this recipe has real maple and such simple ingredients. Thank you for sharing!

April

I just made this for our family Christmas Party on December 1, 2019. It was a big hit! Everybody loved it. I’m definitely going to purchase a candy thermometer because I will be making this recipe again and again.

Linda
Super rich and ever-so-creamy, this Old Fashioned Maple & Walnut Fudge is made with real Maple Syrup, cream, butter and walnuts.

Deniz Tezcan

Friday 10th of September 2021

This recipe sounds amazing! I’m going to make it tomorrow. I was wondering, has anyone tried roasting/toasting the walnuts before crushing and adding to the fudge?

Elizabeth Lampman

Saturday 11th of September 2021

I haven't tried using roasted walnut but it should work just fine!

Lisa Deleo

Wednesday 8th of September 2021

I would like to make the maple fudge. I am thinking about adding mini chocolate chips along with walnuts.. what do you think?

Mike W.

Thursday 28th of January 2021

I've decided that I'm going to make this fudge after I finish my boil this year, using black walnuts I harvested fall of 2019 and dairy I get from a local herdshare dairy. So I guess the biggest problem is whether to make enough to share or not! 😁 Now my question for clarification is, following the directions (specifically the following section) is there any point in the stovetop portion of preparation that I am stirring the mixture?

#4. Pour in the heavy cream without stirring it in...

#5. Remove the pan from the heat and add the butter without stirring...

I realize that I'm mixing it after cooking and I'm planning on using my countertop Kitchen Aid mixer but would you recommend using the paddle or whisk attachment?

Can't wait...!

Elizabeth

Friday 29th of January 2021

Hi Mike, you want to avoid stirring the fudge during the cooking portion because it could cause the sugar to crystallize and you will get a grainy fudge.

It is best to use a paddle attachment, and I guess I should have specified that. :)

Amy R.

Thursday 7th of January 2021

First time I have ever attempted fudge. I have now made this twice. The first time, the taste and texture were perfect however the consistency was a bit soft. I realized I must of either slightly under cooked it by a degree or two in haste, or not whipped it long enough. So I had no choice but to eat it and make another batch. This time I cooked it to exactly soft Ball temp 236 degrees and whipped it a little harder and longer. Results were absolute perfection. Now I just have to promise myself not to make it more than once a year!

Lola

Saturday 19th of December 2020

I cooked mine a lot longer and it still didn’t set If I hear again to 236 degrees do I just pour it back into the parchment paper to set? No other steps? What temp do you simmer at? I did low but took forever and still didn’t set What a disappointment

Elizabeth

Sunday 20th of December 2020

It sounds like your fudge wasn't heated enough. Add a little cream and reheat, test to make sure it has properly hit the soft ball stage as directed but make sure not to over-head or it will get grainy.

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