Jamaican Rice and Peas Recipe

This Jamaican Rice and Peas recipe is an authentic recipe for a popular side dish to most Jamaican meals. This traditional recipe uses fragrant thyme and coconut for a rice that is full of flavour! 

 

This Jamaican Rice and Peas recipe is an authentic recipe for a popular side dish to most Jamaican meals. This traditional recipe uses fragrant thyme and coconut for a rice that is full of flavour! 

 

  This Jamaican Rice and Peas recipe is an authentic recipe for a popular side dish to most Jamaican meals and is full of great Jamaican flavours.

 

Rice and Peas is a staple in the Jamaican diet and is a great accompaniment to most Jamaican entrees, such as Jerk Chicken or my Caribbean Okra and Shrimp.  It’s nice with a little fresh hot pepper sauce sprinkled on top as well.

 

This Jamaican Rice and Peas recipe is an authentic recipe for a popular side dish to most Jamaican meals and is full of great Jamaican flavours.

 

We like to use red kidney beans but you can swap in gungo (or pigeaon) peas if you can get them.

You can also omit the scotch bonnet peppers if you don’t like heat as they are very hot, however cooked whole it lends more flavour than heat.

 This Jamaican Rice and Peas recipe is an authentic recipe for a popular side dish to most Jamaican meals and is full of great Jamaican flavours.

 

 

Jamaican Rice and Peas

Ingredients:

 1 cup of dried red kidney beans or pigeon peas, soaked overnight and drained
 2 cloves of garlic, crushed
 3 Green Onions or Scallions, crushed
 1 Can of Coconut Milk
 1 Whole Scotch Bonnet Pepper
 3 sprigs of fresh thyme
 1 tsp Salt
 1 tsp Black Pepper
 3 cups of rice

 

This Jamaican Rice and Peas recipe is an authentic recipe for a popular side dish to most Jamaican meals and is full of great Jamaican flavours.

 

 Directions:

Place beans & garlic in a large pot and cover with about 7 cups of water.
 
Bring to a boil and then turn down to simmer and cook until the beans are tender, about 45 minutes. You can test the beans by trying to crush one with the back of a spoon.  If they crush easily then they are ready
 
Stir in the coconut milk, green onions, thyme, scotch bonnet pepper, salt, pepper and rice.
 
Bring back to a boil and cook until the rice is tender and has absorbed most of the liquid.  Time depends on the type of rice used.
 
 This Jamaican Rice and Peas recipe is an authentic recipe for a popular side dish to most Jamaican meals and is full of great Jamaican flavours.
 
Jamaican Rice & Peas
Traditional Jamaican Rice & Peas recipe - Great accompaniment to most Jamaican entrees!
Servings: 8
Ingredients
  • 1 cup of dried red kidney beans or pigeon peas soaked overnight and drained
  • 2 cloves of garlic crushed
  • 3 Green Onions or Scallions crushed
  • 1 Can of Coconut Milk
  • 1 Whole Scotch Bonnet Pepper
  • 3 sprigs of fresh thyme
  • 1 tsp Salt
  • 1 tsp Black Pepper
  • 3 cups of rice
Instructions
  1. Place beans & garlic in a large pot and cover with about 7 cups of water.
  2. Bring to a boil and then turn down to simmer and cook until the beans are tender, about 45 minutes. You can test the beans by trying to crush one with the back of a spoon. If they crush easily then they are ready
  3. Stir in the coconut milk, green onions, thyme, scotch bonnet pepper, salt, pepper and rice.
  4. Bring back to a boil and cook until the rice is tender and has absorbed most of the liquid. Time depends on the type of rice used.
 
This Jamaican Rice and Peas recipe is an authentic recipe for a popular side dish to most Jamaican dinner recipes. This traditional recipe uses fragrant thyme and coconut for a rice that is full of flavour!
 
 

36 thoughts on “Jamaican Rice and Peas Recipe

  1. One of the things I miss about living in the city was all the great food just a couple minutes walk from my door. There was a very popular Jamaican restaurant a block away….amazing food. And no matter what we ordered, we always got rice and peas to go with it!

    1. It’s one of the hottest peppers you can get and used often in Jamaican cooking. They look like teeny tiny miniature sweet peppers and come in a variety of colours. They are easy to find in the grocery store.

    1. Heidi, the pepper doesn’t actually make the rice spicy as you don’t cut it or crush it. It just adds a little flavouring, you could totally leave it out though.

  2. This looks amazing! I will try this with your Jerk Chicken recipe 🙂 Our household loves chicken, so new recipes and side dishes that compliment it are always great!

  3. I have never tried anything Jamaican before! This looks really hearty and yummy for those colder months! I will love to try this

  4. As a Jamaican myself, kudos to you! Your rice looks fluffy and good, not wet and sticky as I’ve seen some people’s. I must say though (not particularly related to this post), I have yet to see anyone in the states cook true jerk chicken as the seasoning isn’t what makes it jerk but rather the wood 😉 The seasoning found here isn’t remotely near what we use back home either. If you want to know where you can get the wood if you want to try true jerk chicken, let me know and I’ll send you the site 😀

  5. I would love to try to make this! I am not the best at cooking any sort of rice, but I think I could pull this off.

  6. After I add the rice and bring to boil, do I then bring it back to simmer until rice is tender? I’ve never boiled rice for the entire cooking process and was just wondering since I’m notorious for burning the rice lol. Also what type of rice is best? I was planning on using brown rice….

    1. Yeah sorry, you do want to drop it down to a simmer after it comes to a boil. We usually use parboiled rice, but brown rice works well too.

  7. Does the type of beans matter? I tried white beans (dry) and they weren’t tender even after 4 hours!! What did i miss?
    Thank you

    1. Yeah, so that is because the type of bean you use definitely does matter – if you swap the beans you need to know how to cook the particular bean you have chosen. Red kidney beans do not need to be presoaked before cooking. I’m not sure what bean you used, but most of the “white” ones need to be soaked overnight and then still have a cooking time of up to 3 hours.

  8. I like everything about this recipe except I’ve never heard of Scotch Bonnet Pepper. So that’s the only item I’m not sure of.

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